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Trust your instincts — Universal Principles

Trust your instincts

primal instincts, by By WinstonWong*Lately, I’ve been working on a small project at work. When it started I had to make some initial decisions, one of which was a choice between two very similar options. I didn’t fully understand the difference between them, so I just chose one and continued.

Somewhere, I felt that I probably should have taken a few moments to understand that difference, because it did feel rather important. But I felt rushed, so I didn’t.

Halfway into the project, we encountered a problem that forced me to redo most of the work. Guess what was the cause? That very uninformed choice, of course. Had I spent 10 minutes more up front, I’d saved myself several hours of of rework.

Moral of the story? Trust your instincts. Don’t ignore that uneasy feeling that something is not quite right.

2 comments

1 Karin { August 26, 2011 at 08:41 }

This has certanly happend to me too! But are we sure that our instincts are right more often than they are wrong? Can it not be that we more often remembers the uneasy feeling when a decision shows out to be wrong than when it shows out to be the right one?
Although I am questioning the moral of this story I think the conclusion is right. If only because it probably is be more likely, the decision turns out to be wrong, because we have distrusted it from the beginning.

2 Henrik Jernevad { August 27, 2011 at 13:35 }

Good point!
Perhaps if we do not ignore the uneasy feeling, we can get a better result not (always) because there was actually a problem, but because we’ve convinced ourselves of that really there is no problem?